Some pretty things

After leaving Tokyo and before getting to the temple-rich earth of the Yamato Plain, I took relatively few pictures.  But those I took turned out surprisingly well.

The second night after leaving Carol’s place, I stayed at a youth hostel at Omaezaki. In modern Japanese Omaezaki (御前崎) means, oddly enough, something like ‘Cape You Scumbag’: ‘omae’ is a once exceedingly polite second-person pronoun (literally something like “O honorable one before me”) which has become equally rude through devaluation and repeated sarcasm.  This was one of several nights where I tried and failed to get to my destination by dinnertime.  I called ahead, and the guy told me that I wouldn’t make it and that I should buy my own dinner, which I did.  This was insufficient, though, so I ended up going for a late-night (8:30 was late for me) walk around the cape in order to find a convenience store.  I could hear the waves beating against the rocky shore; it was good.

This was the bathroom mirror in the youth hostel.  As I was leaving in the morning I remembered to photograph it, since of course I didn't have my camera when I was bathing.

This was the bathroom mirror in the youth hostel. As I was leaving in the morning I remembered to photograph it, since of course I didn't have my camera when I was bathing.

After I visited the shrine at Ise, the sun set and I happened to be there.

The line across the sky is a mystery.  It was certainly there though.

The line across the sky is a mystery. It was certainly there though.

More of that sky.

More of that sky.

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5 Responses to “Some pretty things”

  1. Yasha Says:

    Perhaps the line is the shadow of a hill/mountain?

    • fmanin Says:

      Wouldn’t that have to be an incredibly tall mountain?

      • Yasha Says:

        Depends on where the sun is. If it is below the horizon, then a mountain could provide a sudden shift from clouds that see the sun to clouds that do not.

        Alternatively, imagine the shadow of a mountain on the earth, and then ponder how, as the sun sets, the shadow would extend all the way out to the horizon, then wrap around the horizon and go back along the clouds.

      • fmanin Says:

        I pondered this beforehand, but it seemed to me that the point during which this is true ought to be minuscule. I guess the photo proves me wrong.

      • Yasha Says:

        If this mechanism is the correct one, I think it requires the clouds to be relatively low, probably not too much higher than double the height of the mountain. That way even at cloud-level the mountain will still significantly affect the shape of the horizon.

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